Apostille

APOSTILLE (If the country that issues the document IS a part of the Apostille Convention)

All documents coming from such a country have to be apostilled; which means:

  • If the document is issued by a private entity or an Institution that doesn´t have an officer´s signature registered with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs:

    1. the signature of the official has to be authenticated by a Notary Public certifying legal existence and validity of the entity, as well as the power the representative bears, and that these powers entitle him/her to sign commitments for the entity. 

    2. The Notary’s signature has to be authenticated by the County or Local Government Clerk.

    3. The County or Local Government Clerk has to be apostilled by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in most countries. In most jurisdictions, the documents issued by government officials will only need to go to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, or equivalent, because these institutions normally have some of their officials´ signatures registered with the Ministry or Secretary of State. It is important to ask whether the official, clerk or Notary have their signatures registered or not, and explain what you need the document for, so they will have it signed by the correct person.

  • If the document is issued by an officer that has their signature registered with the Ministry or Secretary of State, it goes directly to them;

  • Apostilled by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Secretary of State or similar (Ministry of Foreign Affairs in most countries) of the jurisdiction in which the document was issued.

APOSTILLA (Si el país que emite el documento ES parte de la Convención de Apostilla)

Todos los documentos procedentes de ese país deben ser apostillados; lo que significa:

  • Si el documento es emitido por una entidad privada o una institución que no tiene la firma de un oficial registrado en el Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores:

    1. la firma del funcionario debe ser autenticada por un Notario Público que certifique la existencia legal y la validez de la entidad, así como el poder que tiene el representante, y que estos poderes le dan derecho a firmar compromisos para la entidad.

    2. La firma del Notario debe ser autenticada por el Secretario del Condado o del Gobierno Local.

    3. La firma del Secretario del Gobierno Local o del Condado debe ser Apostillado por el Ministerio de Asuntos Exteriores en la mayoría de los países. En la mayoría de las jurisdicciones, los documentos emitidos por los funcionarios del gobierno solo tendrán que ir al Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores, o equivalente, porque estas instituciones normalmente tienen algunas de las firmas de sus funcionarios registradas en el Ministerio o el Secretario de Estado. Es importante preguntar si el funcionario, el Secretario o el Notario tienen sus firmas registradas o no, y explicar para qué necesita el documento, de modo que la persona correcta lo firme.

  • Si el documento es emitido por un oficial que tiene su firma registrada en el Ministerio o el Secretario de Estado, va directamente a ellos;

  • Apostillado por el Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores, el Secretario de Estado o similar (Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores en la mayoría de los países) de la jurisdicción en la que se emitió el documento.